Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
  • LEEP (looped electrosurgical excision procedure) LEEP
    • A procedure done as an outpatient to treat cervical dysplasia.
    • Involves a trip to the operating room where the patient is sedated heavily, a speculum is placed and the cervix visualized.
    • The atypical area of the cervix is then shaved off with a charged electric loop. The tissue is then sent to pathology for evaluation. The cervix is cauterized to prevent bleeding.
    • This procedure is generally well-tolerated and fairly low-risk. Surgical risks include bleeding, infection and the usual risks of anesthesia. There is some controversy over whether LEEP may influence a patientís reproductive future. Multiple procedures certainly may affect cervical competence (ability to hold in a pregnancy). Multiple LEEPs are also implicated as a contributing factor in preterm birth (PTB), though no one cause has been found for PTB.
    • A 90 percent cure is reported.
    • After the procedure, most patients experience increased discharge for weeks. Sometimes it is bloody. They should not experience heavy bleeding as a result of the procedure. They may also experience some significant contractions.
    • We recommend patients abstain from intercourse for two weeks after a LEEP. Most patients will want to not work the day of their procedure, though working the day after is certainly feasible for most patients.
    • Postoperative follow up varies depending on the grade of the lesion found. Most patients will be offered a follow-up pap smear and possible colposcopy at three months.
    • (Picture taken from UpToDate. Wellesley MA. Version 13.2)
  • Lupron
    • A medicine technically termed a gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist. In simpler terms, it inhibits the brains release of hormones which stimulate the ovaries to make follicles and, thus, estrogen. The result is estrogen deprivation, that is, menopause.
    • It is completely reversible.
    • Gynecologists typically use it to treat endometriosis, some fibroids or as an adjunct to some infertility treatment.
    • May be administered as a monthly or tri-monthly injection. Usually given for a three to six month trial which in special circumstances may be extended.
    • Side effects of the medicine are profound. It essentially induces a temporary menopause. Thatís the effect of estrogen deprivation. So the patients have hot flashes, mood changes and vaginal dryness. They also may suffer significant bone loss.
    • To combat some of these side effects, especially the bone loss, most physicians will recommend taking calcium daily as well as hormonal add-back therapy (usually a low dose progesterone).
    • See also: EndoFacts.
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